Archive for category Culture

Before Getting A Cream, You Should Read This!

creamsEveryone, especially women, want to look young forever. That is why there are anti aging creams for everyone. Although they are listed or labeled as for everyone, it means for every adult age. Skin condition is not an excepted though. Most people would ask, “What is the best wrinkle cream?” without getting their skin checked first. It is really important to get your skin checked for any chemical allergies or skin condition. Most people who want to use wrinkle cream experience skin irritation. It is not the cream’s company’s fault if they didn’t get their skin checked before they started using creams.

Before asking, “What is the best wrinkle cream?” to your pharmacist, always remember to find out the effects of each ingredient to your skin. It is useless if you already found the answer to your question: “What is the best wrinkle cream?” but you have not found out your skin allergies yet. Maybe you can go to a …

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The Plight Of The Family Farm Remains Dark

agSix successive generations of my family have lived in the clapboard farmhouse I now call home. But unless farming as we know it today changes dramatically, it is likely that the seventh generation will be forced to move on, that the farm on which they grew up will be lost, and that the farmhouse itself will disappear from the landscape. Neighbors who once talked of improving their homesteads to make sure their children had a good place to start off are more likely now to sigh and say, “I’ll sell when I retire, so the kids can have a little money and won’t have to go through all I did.”

There are points of debate regarding how best to help small farmers, but in this, the 11th hour, two things are clear: Farmers must market their crops directly to consumers, and the government must cease subsidizing conglomerates at the expense of small growers. Only under these conditions will farm families

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Kickin’ It Amish Style

kiasLittle has changed in the rolling hills of northeastern Ohio since the early 1800s, when word of inexpensive acreage in this fertile firm country first lured members of Pennsylvania’s well-established Amish community to move west. Today nearly 37,000 Amish and Mennonites call the region home, with the highest concentration–some 17,000 strong–in bucolic Holmes County, a 424-square-mile oasis south of Cleveland.

The Amish, whose religious beliefs mandate that they eschew many modern conveniences (including automobiles, electric appliances, and telephones), continue to live much as their forebears did two centuries ago. This lack of 21st-century trappings and the slower-paced lifestyle it engenders now attract a new breed of traveler–visitors who seek out the area because of its unspoiled scenery and gender ways. Word has gotten out, though, and the growing popularity of the region at times threatens the very tranquillity that makes Holmes County so special. Since tour buses have been known to monopolize main thoroughfares and attractions during peak travel seasons

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